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September 28th, 2011
A Vote For Barak Obama and the Democratic Party

Sharon Jasper, a former St. Bernard complex resident presented by activists Tuesday as a victim of changing public housing policies, took a moment before the start of the City Hall protest to complain about her subsidized private apartment, which she called a "slum."

A HANO voucher covers her rent on a unit in an old Faubourg St. John home, but she said she faced several hundred dollars in deposit charges and now faces a steep utility bill. 

Sharon Jasper has spent 57 of her 58 years dedicated to one cause and one cause only, and has nothing to show for her dedicated servitude.

She has lived in Section 8 housing all but 1 of her 58 years.  It was a legacy passed down from her parents who moved into Section 8 housing in 1949 when she was six months old.  She has passed the legacy down to her children, but fears they may have to get jobs to pay for the utilities and deposits.

She laments about her one year hiatus from the comfort of her Section 8 nirvana, 'I tried it for a year – you know, working and all. It's not anything I would want to go through again, or wish on anyone in my family, but I am damn proud of that year.'

Sharon was moved out of her St. Bernard housing project after hurricane Katrina and into a new, yet albeit, substandard quarters. As can be noted from the above photo of her new Section 8 home, it is repugnant and not suitable for someone of Sharon Jasper's seniority status in the system. 'Don't be fooled by them hardwood floors,' says Sharon.

'They told me they were putting in scraped wood floors cause it was more expensive and elegant, but I am not a fool - that was just a way to make me take scratched up wood because I am black.  The 60 inch HD TV? It may look nice but it is not plasma.  It's not a plasma because I'm black.  Now they want me to pay a deposit and utilities on this dump. 'Do you know why?'

She has held her tongue in silence through the years of abuse by the system, but it came to a head at the New Orleans’s city council meeting where discussions were under way about the tearing down of the St. Bernard projects. When a near riotous exchange between groups opposing the tearing down of St. Bernard and groups wanting the dilapidated buildings torn down and newer ones built, Sharon unleashed verbal hell with her once silenced tongue. The object of her oratory prowess was an acquiescent poor white boy in attendance. The context of her scathing rebuke was, 'Just because you pay for my house, my car, my big screen and my food, medical needs. I will not be treated like a slave!' and 'Back up and Shut up! White boy Shut up, white boy!

Recapping from the log of the city council minutes; Sharon repines, 'Our families have been displaced all over the United States. They are being forced to commit crimes in cities they are unfamiliar with.  It is a very uncomfortable situation for them.  Bring them back, then let's talk about redevelopment.'

Sharon directs the reporter's attention across the street to Duncan Plaza where homeless people are living in tents and states that, 'I might do better out there with one of these tents.'  She further lamented her sentiments about her situation, 'I might be poor, but I don't have to live poor.'

 

PRODUCER'S NOTE -

The actual report of her statement is starkly altered and noticeably edited for content:

"I'm tired of the slum landlords, and I'm tired of the slum houses," she said.

Pointing across the street to an encampment of homeless people at Duncan Plaza, Jasper said, "I might do better out here with one of these tents."

Jasper, who later allowed a photographer to tour the subsidized apartment, also complained about missing window screens, a slow leak in a sink, a warped back door and a few other details of a residence that otherwise appeared to have been recently renovated.

At the City Hall protest, a crowd of people railed against "privatization and gentrification of the city," saying it would be a mistake to raze well-built public housing at a time when so many people need affordable housing. One of their leaders, Loyola University law professor Bill Quigley, said it's appropriate that advocates for the poor from across the country have gathered in New Orleans to help fight the demolitions.

"This is a national scandal," he said.

(Source) 


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Comments:


y'all owe me mo - 2012-05-09
need to raise taxes on everybody so this vunable can have dem a mo betta crib
by cpfstock



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