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March 21st, 2011
You May Be a Citizen...

From Newsweek:

They’re the sort of scores that drive high-school history teachers to drink. When NEWSWEEK recently asked 1,000 U.S. citizens to take America’s official citizenship test, 29 percent couldn’t name the vice president. Seventy-three percent couldn’t correctly say why we fought the Cold War. Forty-four percent were unable to define the Bill of Rights. And 6 percent couldn’t even circle Independence Day on a calendar.

Don’t get us wrong: civic ignorance is nothing new. For as long as they’ve existed, Americans have been misunderstanding checks and balances and misidentifying their senators. And they’ve been lamenting the philistinism of their peers ever since pollsters started publishing these dispiriting surveys back in Harry Truman’s day. (He was a president, by the way.) According to a study by Michael X. Delli Carpini, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication, the yearly shifts in civic knowledge since World War II have averaged out to “slightly under 1 percent.”

The U.S. citizenship test is comprised of 100 questions, across five categories: American government, systems of government, rights and responsibilities, American history and integrated civics. Ten questions from the 100 are chosen randomly for the test-taker. To pass, one must get at least six right. In its poll of 1,000 people, the Daily Beast rotated the questions. Beyond the topline—62 percent of Americans passed, 38 percent failed—there are huge discrepancies in the kinds of civic knowledge Americans collectively possess. The following is a look at some of the questions and the percentage of people who got them right and wrong.


TAKE THE QUIZ HERE!


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Test - 2011-03-21
Link to citizenship test not working
by Tony



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